To kill a mockingbird chapter 13 15 summary. SparkNotes: To Kill a Mockingbird: Part Two, Chapters 12 2019-03-03

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To Kill a Mockingbird Chapter 15 Summary & Analysis from LitCharts

to kill a mockingbird chapter 13 15 summary

At the start of Chapter 12, Jem has turned twelve years old, and he continues to grow farther apart from Scout. Scout wants to be like Burris Ewell and not have to go to school at all. Harper Lee uses such language to point out this racism and give an accurate portrayal of sentiments in the South, though she certainly does not condone such language or such a mentality. Through Scout, Lee gives the reader a feel for the small Southern town of Maycomb, Alabama, which is loosely based on Lee's hometown of Monroeville, Alabama. The children begin to leave but, just then, a group of cars shows up.

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SparkNotes: To Kill a Mockingbird: Chapters 14

to kill a mockingbird chapter 13 15 summary

Fire trucks arrive after that; unfortunately, they are unable to stop her house from burning down, but they do prevent other houses nearby from catching fire as well. He announces he will be going out for a while and wishes the children good night. Scout discovers something under her bed. As he and Atticus face off, Scout realizes that, although they do not look alike physically, they are somehow like one another. The reader has the advantage of a storyteller who can look back at a situation and see herself exactly as she was. As he struggles, Atticus arrives and catches them all. In this section, Jem and Scout receive insults about Atticus from a grumpy woman-Mrs.


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To Kill a Mockingbird Chapter 13 Summary

to kill a mockingbird chapter 13 15 summary

Their sister Alexandra remained at Finch's Landing. Later, Scout overhears her father talking to Uncle Jack about the case. Scout rudely asks him what he's doing and Calpurnia gives her a lecture in the kitchen about how to treat guests - even if they're from a family like the Cunninghams. Scout, knowing the community as she does and as innocent as she is, doesn't understand why anyone would believe Bob Ewell's word over anyone else's. Jem suggests that they not disturb Atticus and return home. Jem plays Boo, Dill plays Mr. The family lost its wealth in the Civil War.

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SparkNotes: To Kill a Mockingbird: Part Two, Chapters 12

to kill a mockingbird chapter 13 15 summary

She says that Arthur was a nice boy when she used to know him. Harper Lee's classic novel of modern American literature is one of the most taught books about hero Atticus Finch deals with race relations, segregation and injustice in American South during the Great Depression. Jem runs into the Radleys' yard and touches the outside of the house. Walter hesitates but then takes Jem up on the friendly offer. Scout agrees with this decision and explains her understanding to her father. Additionally, Scout begins to realize the courage her father has, even though he is not the masculine hunter or fisherman like other fathers in town. Scout knew she had gotten her father back! However, Tom, Scout, and Jem, could also be considered mockingbirds as well.

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To Kill a Mockingbird Chapter 13

to kill a mockingbird chapter 13 15 summary

Simply because of their racial prejudice, the townspeople are prepared to accept the word of the cruel, ignorant Bob Ewell over that of a decent black man. When the children return home, they find Aunt Alexandra waiting for them. In order to get to Mr. That night Atticus finally came home from working with the State. When Scout explains that Walter can't pay back the lunch money Miss Caroline offered, the teacher taps Scout's hand with a ruler and makes her stand in the corner of the room. Atticus goes to the jail with the intention of preventing a lynch mob from getting to Tom Robinson.

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To Kill a Mockingbird Chapter 15 Summary & Analysis from LitCharts

to kill a mockingbird chapter 13 15 summary

Radley, and Scout plays Mrs. Terrified, Scout runs back home, but leaves the tire behind. Dill, in childish fashion, has decided to get engaged to Scout, but now he and Jem play together often and Scout finds herself unwelcome. Jem and Scout rushed to greet Atticus and Scout asked Atticus if he brought her home a book and if he knew Aunt Alexandria was there. However, one day a rabid dog shows up in the community. Several days after Dill's appearance, a group of men shows up at Atticus' house-including the sheriff- with news that Tom Robinson is being transferred to another jail.


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To Kill a Mockingbird Chapter 15 Summary

to kill a mockingbird chapter 13 15 summary

Cunningham squats down and tells Scout that he's going to give Walter her message. They did not go to church, Maycomb's principle recreation, but worshipped at home. Jem finally agrees to do this. She calls Jem in and they discover Dill hiding there. Miss Maudie explains that the Radleys are foot-washing Baptists - they believe all pleasure is a sin against God, and stay inside most of the time reading the Bible. All the other children in the class understand this: growing up in this setting teaches children that people can behave a certain way simply because of the family or group that they come from.

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To Kill a Mockingbird Chapter 15 Summary & Analysis from LitCharts

to kill a mockingbird chapter 13 15 summary

He accuses them of putting Boo's life history on display for the edification of the neighborhood. Atticus teaches Scout about compromise: if she goes to school, Atticus will let her keep reading with him at home. The children don't know if the knothole is someone's hiding place or if the pennies are a gift, but decide to take them and keep them safely at the bottom of Jem's trunk. The children comfort her and she reads them a story. All three children are bewildered by the jury's decision to convict; Atticus tries to explain why the jury's decision was in many ways a foregone conclusion. Chapter 11 is the final chapter in Part I of the novel.

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To Kill a Mockingbird Chapter 15 Summary

to kill a mockingbird chapter 13 15 summary

Dill thinks Boo Radley died and Jem says they stuffed his body up the chimney. Scout Justifies this lie saying that sometimes you must lie when there is nothing you can do about a situation. This speech demonstrates the gulf between blacks and whites in Maycomb: not only do class distinctions and bigotry divide the two races, but language does as well. The Radley house is old, dark, closed-off, and uncivilized in contrast to the rest of the neighborhood: once white, it is now a slate-gray color, with rotten shingles, little sunlight, overgrown yards, and a closed door on Sundays. Though Scout is young and impressionable, she becomes a spokesperson for her entire class, interacting with the adult teacher comfortably; this shows that though a child, she is more grown-up than some of her peers. Meanwhile, Dill seems to represent the earlier childhood that Scout reflected on so fondly in the novel. Her character serves as the bridge between two worlds, and the reader develops a sense of her double life, which is split between the Finch household and the black community.


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