Antigone setting. Antigone Study Guide from LitCharts 2019-01-06

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Antigone Summary

antigone setting

Introduction to Antigone In the 1960s, Rosa Parks refused to give her seat up to a white person and started one of the biggest legal fights of the era. In Front Of the Palace, Thebes, Ancient Greece Antigone, like , is set in that disaster-prone city-state known as Thebes. Antigone believes that there are rights that are inalienable because they come from the highest authority, or authority itself, that is the divine law. His speech is an interesting experiment in the history of Greek drama, as it attempts to approximate the rhythms and diction of natural speech. In its complete sense, however, setting includes everything about an environment and situation. Creon realizes that Teiresias has never been wrong and that he must do his bidding.

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Antigone

antigone setting

We receive further evidence that not all citizens of Thebes are pleased with the new king. Sophocles wants to warn his countrymen about hubris, or arrogance, because he believes this will be their downfall. It includes an overture and seven choruses. His interpretation is in three phases: first to consider the essential meaning of the verse, and then to move through the sequence with that understanding, and finally to discern what was nature of humankind that Sophocles was expressing in this poem. The authentic Greek definition of humankind is the one who is strangest of all. Creon urges her to find Haemon and marry quickly.

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by Sophocles

antigone setting

Scene 2 Analysis: Creon is startled to see his niece brought forward for burying Polyneices. Antigone therefore decides that she must respect divine will, disrespect royal law and bury her brother Polyneices. With the argument of tradition, and with reminders of their common identity as the children of the doomed Oedipus, Antigone encourages Ismene to join her, literally to lift their brother's body together, to assure him rest. He is enraged by the sight of Creon, for he blames him for all his misery and attempts to stab his father. Written by Antigone represents the epitome of philosophical thought in antiquity. Specifically, Theban Princess Antigone does not have the strength to bury her brother Polyneices properly on her own. Socrates raises the question as to whether the gods love the pious because it is the pious or whether something pious is only pious because it is loved by the gods.

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Antigone Characters

antigone setting

Along with playing narrator, the Chorus also attempts to intercede throughout the play, whether on the behalf of the Theban people or the horrified spectators. Haemon is hardly satisfied with the outcome and soon departs. Summary of Antigone Antigone begins with The two sons of Oedipus, Eteocles and Polyneices, who are fighting for the kingship of Thebes. Antigone blames the curse for her fate. She decides to break the royal law and honor divinely sanctioned rights of all Thebans to below ground burials and Theban style funeral rites. Here, the chorus is composed of old men who are largely unwilling to see civil disobedience in a positive light.

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Antigone Summary

antigone setting

So again, having all of the dramatic action occur in front of the palace itself reinforces a situation where a king places himself outside of tradition and divine support in order to become a kind of law unto himself. Guards lead her away to be sealed up alive in a tomb. Creon is left a broken man. Creon becomes furious, and seeing Ismene upset, thinks she must have known of Antigone's plan. However, Antigone, who was betrothed to Creon's surviving son Haemon, defies Creon's orders and buries her brother. When his year is up, he decides he likes being king with a little influence from Uncle Creon and does not abdicate the throne. Proved to be more reasonable than Creon, he attempts to reason with his father for the sake of Antigone.


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What is the setting of 'Antigone'

antigone setting

Prologue Analysis: Upon the death of Oedipus the King, his sons Eteocles and Polyneices are to rule in alternating years. When he finally understands that the gods think he is wrong he does relent, but it doesn't matter. In the end, he realizes his tragic flaw- but it is too late, for his wife and son died. For Creon, the fact that Polyneices has attacked the city effectively revokes his citizenship and makes him a foreigner. Antigone does not deny that Polyneices has betrayed the state, she simply acts as if this betrayal does not rob him of the connection that he would have otherwise had with the city. His test comes immediately as a sentry informs him that Polyneices has been buried. Specifically, a guard brings Theban Princess Antigone before King Creon and says that she is caught burying her brother Polyneices.

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Antigone (1961)

antigone setting

For all of the preceding reasons, Antigone can claim the royal palace as her one and only address in her hometown of Thebes. She goes through the burial and anointing once again. Specifically, the term arrogance describes an exaggerated sense of self, pride. But their sister, Antigone herself and Creon's soon-to-be daughter-in-law refuses to accept the punishment and buries her brother against the law. Creon has declared that Eteocles will be honored with burial since he was a defender of Thebes, while Polyneices' body is left to the vultures and dogs. She is taken away to her living tomb, with the Leader of the Chorus expressing great sorrow for what is going to happen to her.

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by Sophocles

antigone setting

Is her pious belief in the Gods something she ought to uphold? Crean, the new ruler of Thebes Creon decrees that Eteocles should have an honorable burial while the body of the traitor Polynieces should be left on the battlefield to be eaten by jackals and vultures. C by Sophocles, it is of the few remarkable plays that have stood the test of time. Antigone makes an impassioned argument, declaring Creon's order to be against the laws of the gods themselves. Antigone is a play of great historical significance. But Antigone does not sway from her righteousness, saying she would rather die than see Polyneices unburied and left as food for the vultures and that she would only return to doing what she believes in. Sophocles: Oedipus the King, Oedipus at Colonus, Antigone.

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SparkNotes: Antigone: Character List

antigone setting

When this son went to Thebes to compete in athletic contests, Creon recognized him and put him to death, whereupon his parents committed suicide. The death he specifies — stoning — requires the participation of the whole city. She believes in the divine will that guarantees to all Thebans rights to … below ground burials. Specifically, Theban Princess Antigone accepts the gods as the ultimate authority in life and death. Both Antigone and Creon claim divine sanction for their actions; but the prophet supports Antigone's claim that the gods demand Polyneices' burial. Ismene's fate is not directly stated but it can be assumed that she continued living after her sister's death, the only surviving child of Oedipus. Haemon comes to Creon to ask him to reconsider.

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Antigone

antigone setting

Euthyphro explains to Socrates that something pious just, good is something unanimously loved by the Gods. The character of Teiresias is brought into the setting to reinforce the idea that Creon stands opposed to both the natural order and just rule in Theban tradition. They comment on the major events of the play and provide the audience with the public reaction to the private struggles of the ruling family of Thebes. Antigone interrupts him, pointing out that she is soon to die. Scenes 4 and 5 Scene 4: Antigone is taken to the place where she is to die. Creon discovers that someone has attempted to offer a ritual burial to Polynices and demands that the guilty one be found and brought before him.

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